Tag Archives: flowers

I’m finally a country girl again

Yep, four months ago, we moved into what I affectionately call #countryhouse, a 20-year-old ranch home on 5 beautiful acres in central Texas. For most of the time since moving to Texas in August of 2014, we lived in a new house in a new subdivision. The house was OK, the lot was teeny-tiny. Picture standing between your house and your neighbor’s and being able to touch both houses with your arms stretched out. Well, maybe not that close, but you get the idea. I hated the closeness.

Enough about the old house. Continue reading

2015_Day 361: It was nice while it lasted

I had to take a photo (above) of my blooming flower bed on Saturday in all its winter glory. I’m glad I did. The mercury dipped some 20 degrees in 15 minutes this morning, and with at- or below-freezing low temperatures predicted for at least the next week, the flowers’ beauty is probably short-lived. Continue reading

2015_Day 351: Pink Champagne Ruby Grass

One of the new plants I tried this year was Pink Champagne Ruby Grass. I bought two 1-quart containers fairly early in the spring and planted one each in the center of the two big planters on my back porch. The grass was really easy to take care of, and stayed green into November. Continue reading

2015_Day 350: Forever flowers? I’ll take ’em

Is this what a flower bed looks like in central Texas in mid-December? It’s what mine–or at least one of mine–looks like as of today. It’s the first year for the flower beds, so even though we lived in Texas last December, I hadn’t put the raised flower beds in. Continue reading

2015_Day 339: A is for anthuriums

It’s days like today that I feel like such a newbie to flowers. I saw these beautiful plants at a local store and they took my breath away! I don’t recall ever seeing them before and didn’t know what they were until I read the information card tucked into the dirt of one. Anthuriums, it said. Amazing, I thought. Continue reading

2015_Day 332: Cold and colorful

On one end of our yard sits the raised beds that held fruits and vegetables most of the spring and summer. The only thing left in them now are what remains of the tomato and pumpkin plants. Although the pumpkin vines have been reduced mostly to mush in the cold and rain of late, the actual pumpkin still stands out brightly, its orange half facing the sky. Continue reading